Category Douglas McDonnell

THIS IS NO ORDINARY MD-10-30

By: Category: Air FreightersAirlinersAviation HistoryDouglas McDonnellEAA AirVentureMedical Aircraft

On March 27th, 1973, McDonnell Douglas DC-10-30CF, MSN 46800/Line number 96 and registered N101TV of Trans International Airlines took to the sky for the first time. This would be the 96th DC-10 to roll off the Long Beach California production line and was manufactured in such a way that the aircraft could be converted back and forth from a passenger configuration to a cargo configuration hence the CF (Convertible Freighter) designation. These versions of the DC-10 were easily recognizable by the large 102”x140” cargo door on the side of the fuselage. The DC-10-30CF is powered by three General Electric CF6-50C2 Turbofan engines which each generate 51,000#’s of thrust and can carry up to 380 passengers or 23 positions of cargo with a range up to 5,750 miles...

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MISSIONS OF MERCY

By: Category: Air FreightersAirlinersAviation HistoryDouglas McDonnellEAA AirVenture


One of the main themes of AirVenture 2021 was a salute to humanitarian aviation, and this 1969 vintage Douglas DC-8-72, Serial Number 46013/Line Number 427, fits the bill perfectly. This almost 54-year-old DC-8 was originally delivered as DC-8-62CF (Convertible Freighter) to Finnair in January of that year. Finnair would pass this aircraft to the French Air Force in 1981, which saw the original Pratt and Whitney JT3D-3B engines replaced with the CFM International CFM56-2 engines, this is where the designation was changed from a 62CF to a 72CF...

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Twin and Triple-engined Jet Freighter Scrapbook

By: Category: Air FreightersAirbusAirlinersAviation PhotographyBoeingDouglas McDonnell

The majority of purposely-built jet freighters of the 1970s and before used to be large, four-engined, airframes like Boing 747s, 707s, and DC-8s. These were built specifically for long range flight; many national and international airlines had their own air freight branches, and collected their freight at specific hubs. Airlines used their belly space in smaller airliners for freight, which was transferred at hubs into larger jets for further distribution. Soon, DC-10s and Lockheed Tristars were used for their combination of range and capacity too. 

Overnight freight business took off, like Federal Express’s Falcon 20 fleet, which grew into a larger fleet converted using B-727-100 medium haul freighters...

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